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Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

  • Authors: Floreano, Dario; Pericet Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphäel; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L"Eplattenier, Géraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, and high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging, because it requires accurate alignment of the photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here we describe a novel design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array and a flexible printed circuit board, that are stacked, cut and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up new vistas for a broad range of applications where wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories.

Posted on: April 25, 2013

Self-organisation of motion features with a temporal asynchronous dynamic vision sensor

  • Authors: Koeth, F.; Marques, H. G.; Delbruck, T.

Neural circuits closer to the periphery tend to be organised in a topological way, i.e. stimuli which are spatially close tend to be mapped onto neighbouring processing neurons. The goal of this study is to show how motion features (optic-flow), which have an inherent spatio-temporal profile, can be self-organised using correlations of precise spike intervals. The proposed framework is applied to the spiking output of an asynchronous dynamic vision sensor (DVS), which mimics the workings of the mammalian retina. Our results show that our framework is able to form a topologic organisation of optic-flow features similar to that observed in the human middle temporal lobe.

Posted on: July 30, 2014